harper - cyanotype

harper

A familiar. Cyanotype c. 9x12cm Varied edition: 7 prints £30 Third Witch:  “Harper cries: ’Tis time, ’tis time.” Shakespeare “Macbeth”, Act 4, Scene 1

pain inflicted, suffering endured, injustice done

There were an estimated 4,000-6,000 witchcraft trials in Scotland, three times more than in England.  About three quarters of the accused were women. Scottish witchcraft trials were notable for their use of pricking: the suspect’s skin was pierced with needles and pins, as it was believed that witches could not feel pain.  Confessions were often…

the fates installation

the fates

The witches in Shakespeare’s “Macbeth” are often interpreted as representing the Fates of classical mythology. They appear at the birth of each person, spinning, measuring, and cutting the thread of life. The Old English word ‘wyrd’ or ‘weird’ means ‘fate’. Clotho spun the thread of life from her Distaff onto her Spindle. Lachesis measured the…

the gates of hell

the gates of hell

Ah, the irony. Acrylic on 640gsm Fabriano Artistico paper, with collage 56x76cm £500 Porter: Here’s a knocking indeed! If a man were porter of hell gate, he should have old turning the key. (Knock.) Knock, knock, knock! Shakespeare “Macbeth” Act 3, Scene 3

banquo's dream

banquo's dream

Acrylic on 640gsm Fabriano Artistico paper, with collage 56x76cm £500 Banquo: I dreamt last night of the three Weïrd Sisters. To you they have showed some truth. Shakespeare “Macbeth” Act 2, Scene 1

banquo's dream

banquo’s dream

Acrylic on 640gsm Fabriano Artistico paper, with collage 56x76cm £500 Banquo: I dreamt last night of the three Weïrd Sisters. To you they have showed some truth. Shakespeare “Macbeth” Act 2, Scene 1

lachesis v

lachesis

The witches in Shakespeare’s “Macbeth” are often interpreted as representing the Fates of classical mythology. They appear at the birth of each person, spinning, measuring, and cutting the thread of life. The Old English word ‘wyrd’ or ‘weird’ means ‘fate’. Lachesis measured the thread of life allotted to each person with her measuring rod. Acrylic…

the others iii

the others

“The Other” refers to a person who doesn’t conform with societal norms, and is therefore alienated or marginalised by powerful social institutions, such as the state or the church. Shakespeare’s witches might just have been “Others”. Acrylic on 300gsm Fabriano Artistico paper 14x19cm £45 Acrylic on 300gsm Fabriano Artistico paper 14x19cm £45

a deed without a name

a deed without a name

Blood on their hands … Acrylic on 300gsm Fabriano Artistico paper 14x19cm £45 Macbeth: How now, you secret, black, and midnight hags? What is ’t you do? The Witches: A deed without a name. Shakespeare “Macbeth” Act 4, Scene 1

out damned spot

out, damned spot!

The sleepwalking Lady Macbeth betrays her guilt …. Acrylic on 300gsm Fabriano Artistico paper 14x19cm £45 Lady Macbeth: Out, damned spot, out, I say! One. Two. Why then, ’tis time to do ’t. Hell is murky. Fie, my lord, fie, a soldier and afeard? What need we fear who knows it, when none can call…

the darkness of our condition

the darkness of our condition

Power corrupts … Macbeth and Lady Macbeth. Acrylic on 300gsm Fabriano Artistico paper 14x19cm £45 “I have no spur To prick the sides of my intent, but only Vaulting ambition, which o’erleaps itself And falls on th’ other—” Shakespeare “Macbeth”, Act 1, Scene 7

paisley girl screenprint

paisley girl

In 1697, Paisley, Renfrewshire, Christian Shaw, daughter of the Laird of Bargarran, complained of being tormented by local witches.  Seven people, known as the Paisley, Bargarran or Renfrewshire witches, were found guilty of having bewitched Shaw and were condemned to death. Five of them were hanged then burned on the Gallow Green in Paisley on…

when shall we three meet again?

enter three witches

Linocut 18x18cm Edition: 7 £60 Macbeth, Act 1, Scene i. A desert place. Thunder and lightning. Enter three Witches First Witch When shall we three meet again In thunder, lightning, or in rain? Second Witch When the hurlyburly’s done, When the battle’s lost and won. Third Witch That will be ere the set of sun.…

weird sisters linocut

weird sisters

Shakespeare perhaps based the three witches in Macbeth on Raphael Holinshed’s History of Britain, The Chronicles of England, Scotland, and Ireland (1587) .  In Holinshed’s account of King Duncan, Macbeth and Banquo encounter three women in “strange and wild apparell …the common opinion was that these women were either the Weird Sisters, that is… the…

Blood moon

blood moon

On Monday 28 September, a spectacular “blood moon” was visible between 3-4am as a result of the simultaneous occurrence of a “supermoon” (a full moon when the moon is closest to Earth in its orbit) and a lunar eclipse (the moon passes into the shadow of Earth). This “blood moon” appears red because while sunlight…

something wicked this way comes

something wicked this way comes

Even the three Graces can be made to look sinister in the right light … The role of the three witches in Shakepeare’s Macbeth is ambiguous – they are never actually referred to as witches in the play.  One interpretation is that they were inspired by the Fates – the Moirai of Greek mythology -…

boil & bubble

boil and bubble

Delia, Mary and Nigella as the witches in Macbeth …. Screenprint 40x30cm Varied edition: 11 prints £100 Fillet of a fenny snake, In the cauldron boil and bake; Eye of newt and toe of frog, Wool of bat and tongue of dog, Adder’s fork and blind-worm’s sting, Lizard’s leg and owlet’s wing, For a charm…

familiars screenprint

familiars

The witches in Shakespeare’s Macbeth mention three familiars: Greymalkin, a gray cat; Paddock, a toad; and Harpier, an owl. The witches’ face is also familiar, the face of soprano Lina Cavalieri, used by Piero Fornasetti as a motif in much of his work. Screenprint 40x30cm Edition: 7 £100

familiars screenprint

familiars

The witches in Shakespeare’s Macbeth mention three familiars: Greymalkin, a gray cat; Paddock, a toad; and Harpier, an owl. The witches’ face is also familiar, the face of soprano Lina Cavalieri, used by Piero Fornasetti as a motif in much of his work. Screenprint 40x30cm Edition: 7 £100

The tempest collage

language

The mysterious William Shakespeare (c.1564-1616) is England’s most celebrated dramatist and poet.  He wrote many dramatic works – comedies, histories, tragedies and poetry – that are known around the world for their universal themes and insight into the human condition.  He also shaped the English language, coining many words and phrases still in use in…

connected

connected

A memento of a wonderful evening on a boat, on Lac Léman, in June. For Nastaran and Kim. Digital collage “I never am really satisfied that I understand anything; because, understand it well as I may, my comprehension can only be an infinitesimal fraction of all I want to understand about the many connections and…

deeptime ii

deeptime ii

Argyll’s history is a preoccupation: my work explores what motivated the people to create the many standing stone arrangements, carved rocks, and cairns in the landscape.  This quilt considers possible links between astronomical observations and the alignment or positioning of important monuments.  It features standing stones and the Kilmartin Glen linear cemetery, five cairns –…

kelpies ii - cyanotype

kelpies ii

In Celtic folklore, the kelpie is a supernatural water horse that haunts rivers and streams. They are not benevolent: kelpies were reputed to lure people, especially children, into the water to drown and eat them. Cyanotype c. 5x12cm Varied edition: 2 prints Sold out

breathe - cyanotype

breathe

We inhale oxygen and exhale carbon dioxide.  Trees inhale carbon dioxide and exhale oxygen. Plant more trees. Varied edition Varied edition: 2 prints £30 “In nature nothing exists alone.” -rachel carson

In these shoes?

in these shoes?

On listening to Kirsty MacColl … Découpage – shoes & New Zealand road maps “Some footwear can increase the chance of a slip or trip happening.  Choose shoes that fit well, have sensible heels and stay on the feet.” -Health & Safety Executive

the oceanographer's memory box

the oceanographer’s memory box

This boxed assemblage incorporates text & images from the Report on the Scientific Results of the Voyage of HMS Challenger During the Years 1873-76, paper, shells, glass bottles, twine, an HMS Challenger commemorative stamp and a Challenger Space Shuttle commemorative medal. Assemblage 255x205x60mm (closed) – 410x 255mm (open) Sold “Man cannot discover new oceans unless…

Printmaker

printmaker

Selections of 10 small original prints bound into a book, for those of you who have run out of wall space! Handmade books Varied edition: 3 books Sold out “Outside of a dog, a book is a man’s best friend. Inside of a dog it’s too dark to read.” -groucho marx

The Catch, Oban - Esplanade installation

the catch

Celebrating oceanography in Oban as part of the Festival of the Sea, run by the Scottish Association for Marine Science (SAMS), one of the oldest oceanographic organisations in the world. I made nearly 900 fish.  Thanks to all the elves who contributed to the installation by making and hanging additional fish, and especially to Lindsay…