fibonacci Venus - screenprint

fibonacci venus

You are more beautiful than the Fibonacci sequence …. Italian mathematician Fibonacci (c.1175-1250) analysed the growth of a population of rabbits based on idealized assumptions.  The result was a sequence of numbers which have become known as the Fibonacci sequence. In the Fibonacci sequence, each number is the sum of the previous two numbers.  This sequence…

fugue - screenprint

fugue

In 1964, an article in a journal called the Fibonacci Quarterly demonstrated that Bach’s composition The Art of Fugue exploits the Fibonacci sequence of numbers that recurs again and again in the natural world: in the spiral patterns visible in sunflowers and pine cones, and in the expanding coil of the nautilus shell Screenprint Varied…

elements of trigonometry - collage

elements of trigonometry

Collages inspired by the beauty of trigonometry, the branch of mathematics that descibes relationships between the sides and angles of triangles. The collages incorporate pages from “The Elements of Trigonometry” by W. Emerson, 1788 and features a 19th century wood engraving, familiar from the work of Fornasetti. Collage – vintage book paper, screenprint, origami paper,…

Let me breathe - cyanotype

let me breathe

On listening to Kate Bush’s Breathing … We inhale oxygen and exhale carbon dioxide.  Trees inhale carbon dioxide and exhale oxygen. Plant more trees. Varied edition: 4 prints 13 x 8 cm £30 “In nature nothing exists alone.” -rachel carson

James Cook V - mixed media

james cook v

Captain James Cook (1728-1779) was a British explorer who achieved the first recorded European contact with the eastern coastline of Australia and the Hawaiian Islands, and the first recorded circumnavigation of New Zealand.  Cook became commander of HM Bark Endeavour in 1766 for the first of three Pacific voyages, sailing thousands of miles across largely…

A critical juncture - digital collage

a critical juncture

A common pastime at my primary school was collecting and swapping scraps – die-cut paper images.  Scraps were stored between the pages of a book, either individually or in a set, a collection of a single image in various sizes.  At playtime, collectors would swap scrap books and thumb through the pages, poking scraps of…

starry messenger - digital collage

starry messenger

A common pastime at my primary school was collecting and swapping scraps – die-cut paper images.  Scraps were stored between the pages of a paperback book, either individually or in sets of a single image in various sizes.  At playtime, collectors would swap scrap books and thumb through the pages, poking scraps of interest out…

the price of knowledge - digital collage

the price of knowledge

NASA built six Space Shuttles, reusable low Earth orbital spacecraft. Enterprise was used only for flight tests. Columbia, Challenger, Discovery, Atlantis and Endeavour were used to launch satellites, conduct science experiments in orbit and service the International Space Station. 135 missions were flown between 1981 and 2011. Challenger and Columbia were both destroyed in mission…

a dream of big science - cyanotype

a dream of big science

Maritime expeditions in the Age of Enlightenment were motivated mainly by scientific curiosity.  HMS Challenger set sail from Portsmouth in 1872 to investigate the natural history and geology of the ocean floor. Challenger circumnavigated the globe for three and half years, covering almost 70,000 nautical miles.  The crew dredged up thousands of samples and mapped…

expedition - cyanotype

expedition

The Challenger Expedition followed in the footsteps of many other maritime expeditions.  This image features a map from the Challenger Report, showing the routes taken by the prinicpal expeditions, from the first voyage of Captain Cook through to the Challenger Expedition. Cyanotype Varied edition: 10 prints

challenger deep cyanotype

challenger deep

Challenger Deep is the deepest known point in the Earth’s seabed hydrosphere, with a depth of about 11,000 metres.  It is found at the southern end of the Mariana Trench in the Pacific Ocean. It is named after HMS Challenger, whose crew made the first measurements of its depth.  Only four vehicles have descended into…

moon dreaming textile panel

moon dreaming

Argyll’s landscape contains many prehistoric standing stone arrangements, carved rocks, and cairns.  This textile panel considers possible links between astronomical observations and the alignment or positioning of ancient monuments, featuring a standing stone and the moon. Textile panel 20″x20″ £150

transit textile panel

transit

Argyll’s landscape contains many prehistoric standing stone arrangements, carved rocks, and cairns.  This textile panel considers possible links between astronomical observations and the alignment or positioning of ancient monuments.  It features some standing stones illuminated by the movement of the sun across the sky. Textile panel 20″x20″ Sold

seven sisters textile panel

seven sisters

This textile panel considers possible links between astronomical observations and the alignment or positioning of important monuments. The panel features Pleiades (Messier 45), an open star cluster in the constellation of Taurus.  It is one of the nearest star clusters to Earth and is obvious to the naked eye in the night sky, a prominent…

sky maps textile panel

sky maps

Argyll’s landscape contains many prehistoric standing stone arrangements, carved rocks, and cairns.  This textile panel considers possible links between astronomical observations and the alignment or positioning of ancient monuments.  It features the Pleiades star cluster and a long line of standing stones. Textile panel 20″x20″ Sold

ceremony ii textile panel

ceremony ii

Argyll’s landscape contains many prehistoric standing stone arrangements, carved rocks, and cairns.  The purpose of these monuments is not known for certain.  This textile panel considers possible links between astronomical observations and the alignment or positioning of significant monuments.  It features the Pleiades star cluster and the Kilmartin Glen linear cemetery, five cairns arranged in…

pleiades i textile panel

pleiades i

The panel features Pleiades (Messier 45), an open star cluster in the constellation of Taurus.  It is one of the nearest star clusters to Earth and is obvious to the naked eye in the night sky, a prominent sight in winter in the Northern Hemisphere.  The ten brightest stars of the Pleiades are named after…

navigate ii - screenprint

navigate ii

Screenprint Varied edition: 13 prints c. 20x40cm “The attention of navigators was fully taken up  with the perfecting of their science,  the development of nautical astronomy, the study of the forces which control the magnetic needle, the discovery of the longitude, the search for new lands and new routes.” -Narrative of the Cruise of HMS…

the honeycomb conjecture - cyanotype

the honeycomb conjecture

On watching Brian Cox …. Forces of Nature The honeycomb conjecture: one possible reason for the hexagonal structure of the bee’s honeycomb is efficiency – hexagonal tiling enables bees to create equal-sized cells using the least amount of material. Cyanotype Varied edition: 4 prints This image is available to buy as fabric by the yard…

who's that girl? sculpture

who’s that girl?

A Poltalloch woman wearing some Neolithic bling.  The unusual jet necklace was found in a cist at Poltalloch in Argyll and it is now in the National Museum of Antiquities of Scotland.  Little is known about who wore it and why.  Both the person and the necklace have left only ghostly traces in Kilmartin Glen.…

navigate cyanotype

navigate

Cyanotype Varied edition: 30 prints “The attention of navigators was fully taken up  with the perfecting of their science,  the development of nautical astronomy, the study of the forces which control the magnetic needle, the discovery of the longitude, the search for new lands and new routes.” -Narrative of the Cruise of HMS Challenger

poltalloch i linocut

poltalloch i

Some Neolithic bling: the unusual jet necklace found in a cist at Poltalloch in Argyll.  Little is known about who wore it and why.  It is now in the National Museum of Antiquities of Scotland. Linocut 8x8cm Edition: 10 £20

greywacke

Canterbury’s braided rivers transport shattered greywacke rocks from the Southern Alps over the Canterbury plains to the Pacific Ocean, transforming them into rounded boulders. Acrylic on 640gsm Fabriano paper 28x28cm Varied edition: 4

Blood moon

blood moon

On Monday 28 September, a spectacular “blood moon” was visible between 3-4am as a result of the simultaneous occurrence of a “supermoon” (a full moon when the moon is closest to Earth in its orbit) and a lunar eclipse (the moon passes into the shadow of Earth). This “blood moon” appears red because while sunlight…

deeptime ii

deeptime ii

Argyll’s history is a preoccupation: my work explores what motivated the people to create the many standing stone arrangements, carved rocks, and cairns in the landscape.  This quilt considers possible links between astronomical observations and the alignment or positioning of important monuments.  It features standing stones and the Kilmartin Glen linear cemetery, five cairns –…

breathe - cyanotype

breathe

We inhale oxygen and exhale carbon dioxide.  Trees inhale carbon dioxide and exhale oxygen. Plant more trees. Varied edition Varied edition: 2 prints £30 “In nature nothing exists alone.” -rachel carson

the oceanographer's memory box

the oceanographer’s memory box

This boxed assemblage incorporates text & images from the Report on the Scientific Results of the Voyage of HMS Challenger During the Years 1873-76, paper, shells, glass bottles, twine, an HMS Challenger commemorative stamp and a Challenger Space Shuttle commemorative medal. Assemblage 255x205x60mm (closed) – 410x 255mm (open) Sold “Man cannot discover new oceans unless…

Challenger book

challenger book

Challenger (hardback) An exploration By Alice Strange Book Preview “The vast ocean lay scientifically unexplored  All the efforts of the previous decade had been directed to the strips of water around the coast and to enclosed or partially enclosed seas; great things had certainly been done there, but as certainly far greater things remained to…

we have all the time in the world

we have all the time in the world?

Louis Armstrong singing “We have all the time in the world” is one of my desert island discs. “We have only 10 billion years until the supply of hydrogen in the Sun’s core is exhausted and it enters its Red Giant phase, rendering Earth uninhabitable” was probably difficult to match to a melody and definitely…

Hawking's nemesis

hawking’s nemesis

The event horizon hypothesis is replaced by the apparent horizon hypothesis. Laser-cut plywood Diameter c. 40cm Sold I used to think information was destroyed in black holes.  This was my biggest blunder, or at least my biggest blunder in science.” -stephen hawking

observatory vi - textile panel

observatory vi

Kilmartin Glen in Argyll is one of the richest prehistoric landscapes in Scotland.  The purpose of the standing stones is uncertain. One possibility is that they were positioned to chart the movement of the sun and moon against particular landmarks. Textile panel c. 31x59cm Sold

Observatory V - Kilmartin textile panel

observatory v

Kilmartin Glen in Argyll is one of the richest prehistoric landscapes in Scotland.  The purpose of the standing stones is uncertain. One possibility is that they were positioned to chart the movement of the sun and moon against particular landmarks. The panel features specially printed fabric featuring Kilmartin cup and ring marks. Textile panel c.…

Traces - Kilmartin textile panel

traces

Archaeological excavation is a destructive process, so few sites are excavated entirely.  Information and artefacts obtained from sample pits or ditches are analysed to describe and interpret the site. This panel is inspired by three days spent on an archaeological dig at Dun Mhuirich in Argyll.  It features text from a catalogue of late neolithic…

excavation v - textile panel

excavations v

Archaeological excavation is a destructive process, so few sites are excavated entirely.  Information and artefacts obtained from sample pits or ditches are analysed to describe and interpret the site. This panel is inspired by three days spent on an archaeological dig at Dun Mhuirich in Argyll.  It features text from a catalogue of late neolithic…

Excavations IV - Kilmartin textile panel

excavations iv

Archaeological excavation is a destructive process, so few sites are excavated entirely.  Information and artefacts obtained from sample pits or ditches are analysed to describe and interpret the site. This panel is inspired by three days spent on an archaeological dig at Dun Mhuirich in Argyll.  It features text from a catalogue of late neolithic…

stone voices - textile panel

stone voices

Kilmartin Glen is one of the richest ancient landscapes in Scotland, with many standing stones, cairns, cists, cup & ring marks, henge monuments, forts, duns & crannogs.  Archaeologists and historians pore over these fragments in an attempt to reconstruct our past, construct our identity. Textile panel c. 52x64cm £150

upper largie

upper largie

In Kilmartin, around 3500 BC, a massive timber monument called a cursus was built on a gravel terrace at Upper Largie, the first evidence of neolithic activity there.  It consisted of two lines of parallel lengths of posts that ran for nearly 400 metres.   There are various hypotheses to explain why they were built and…

cursus iii - textile panel

cursus iii

In Kilmartin, around 3500 BC, a massive timber monument called a cursus was built on a gravel terrace at Upper Largie, the first evidence of neolithic activity there.  It consisted of two lines of parallel lengths of posts that ran for nearly 400 metres.   There are various hypotheses to explain why they were built and…

cursus ii

cursus ii

In Kilmartin, around 3500 BC, a massive timber monument called a cursus was built on a gravel terrace at Upper Largie, the first evidence of neolithic activity there.  It consisted of two lines of parallel lengths of posts that ran for nearly 400 metres.   There are various hypotheses to explain why they were built and…

eddie izzard quote

Archaeologists, you found stuff? What have you found, what have you found? Well, give us a toothbrush and ten years and we’ll tell you. -eddie izzard

cursus i - textile panel

cursus i

In Kilmartin, around 3500 BC, a massive timber monument called a cursus was built on a gravel terrace at Upper Largie, the first evidence of neolithic activity there.  It consisted of two lines of parallel lengths of posts that ran for nearly 400 metres.   There are various hypotheses to explain why they were built and…